Dogs

GENERAL RAMBLINGS ABOUT THIS TRIP

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 -Interestingly, people are not that different wherever you go. Families love their children, young folks look towards the future, older folks look back, and many people are happy to make a friend in Canada.

 

-Gosh the the extent of environmental degradation. This was really visible in India and Vietnam. Really. But in many other countries as well, people do not recycle or compost. There would be huge gains to be made in awareness just by doing more, or any, of either.

 

-Facebook has turned out to be a really important tool. I don't FB much, but many local activities and contacts are so easy to handle on messenger, especially if you don't have a phone like us.

 

-that being said, we really could have used a phone in India. Next time I will get one for sure, with a one month subscription or something.

 

-we didn't drive for seven months. We ended up renting a car in a Mexico in late April because we found a stable for Lili to ride at that was a two hour walk away, and there were no buses. So we rented a car on two separate days so she could go to evening class. And one day we cabbed it.

 

-at about five months, we already felt like we had been gone for a year. Now it feels like a year and a half, and counting.

 

-people entertaining theories of working abroad over the Internet may be in for a rude awakening regarding quality and capacity of available bandwidths.... just sayin'.

 

- we have missed the rainiest winter in a century in Vancouver. 

...and dogs are the same all around the world.

...and dogs are the same all around the world.

DOGS ON THE BEACH

The Sayulita beaches are super lovely. I was thinking about why we like them so much, and several things came to mind. One is that there are no big hotels here. This brings a certain human scale to things - we are all little people. There are no big weddings, photo shoots with drones or noisy crowds. (At the resorts where I have taught yoga the wedding frequency was normally minimum one a day). Almost no one smokes on the beach. The vendors are friendly. And there are lots of locals.

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I remember the first time we visited Sayulita I was struck by the dogs on the beach. They are all pretty well behaved and belong to someone. And this time we of course took little Rebi to enjoy some Vitamin D with us. We know that when you take a dog to the beach you have to have an umbrella and provide it some shade. You also need to take a water bowl and some fresh water, especially if you have a little puppy that can get dehydrated pretty quickly.

Here is Lili with Rebi. Later on Rebi dug a little hole in the cool sand under our umbrella and just curled in it and had a long snooze. And why not? She still had stitches on her belly from the spay, the wind was gentle and the sound of the waves hummed a perfect afternoon lullaby.

Here is Lili with Rebi. Later on Rebi dug a little hole in the cool sand under our umbrella and just curled in it and had a long snooze. And why not? She still had stitches on her belly from the spay, the wind was gentle and the sound of the waves hummed a perfect afternoon lullaby.

Rebi snoozing. 

Rebi snoozing. 

Then one day I saw a huge dog on the beach. It was a St. Bernard. It's not very often you see those even in Vancouver. And then there was a second one. And what? A third! Now this was something totally uncommon. 

And then there was their owner, a Mexican man, who abruptly kicked off his shoes, his hat and sunglasses and sprinted right into the waves. And the three huge dogs followed him right in.  It was so striking - a man and three huge dogs bathing in the ocean to cool off. And they all loved it. 

I was not the only person who stopped to watch and take pictures! 

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