Ethnicities

BLENDING IN

This may sound like an odd post but here goes: Rio is the first place on our trip where we are constantly mistaken for locals. 

Dante and Lili walking home from the grocery store. 

Dante and Lili walking home from the grocery store. 

I have to say it is really nice, and it also makes me feel safer (not that we feel unsafe to begin with). I cannot say how many times I have been asked for directions on the metro on in the street. Of course, the illusion disappears the minute I start speaking - my Portuguese is atrocious, and limited to about three sentences!

Having cheap lunch at a side street - eating where the locals eat. 

Having cheap lunch at a side street - eating where the locals eat. 

Brazil is such a melting pot of ethnicities, and it really is a truly multicultural society. Rio has no ethnic neighborhoods at all, people just mix. It is very cool. (Now I hear someone saying hey wait a minute what about the favelas - and that is a good question. The favelas are more defined by economic status than ethnicity - they are poor neighborhoods.)

And of course there are rich neighborhoods as well - every big city has those. In Rio the rich areas are mostly by the water - along the beaches and by the big lagoon. The favelas are on the slopes, with great views across the city and towards the sea - locations that would be super prime real estate in many other cities. 

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Rocinha favela, between Barra de Tijuca and Ipanema. You can see how the structure of the city changes as soon as the buildings start climbing the slope - that is the favela.  Dante asked for public photo credit for these two pics that he expertly took from the car window:  Photos Dante Comoglio

Rocinha favela, between Barra de Tijuca and Ipanema. You can see how the structure of the city changes as soon as the buildings start climbing the slope - that is the favela.  Dante asked for public photo credit for these two pics that he expertly took from the car window:

Photos Dante Comoglio